Slogans and Deception

Western  society  is  beset  with  slogans  of  one  kind  or  another.  There  can  be  few  societies  which  have  had  to  face  so  many.  Not  that  previous  generations  have  not  had  to  respond  to  them.  Virgil  spoke  to  the  ancient  world  of  ‘Eternal  Rome’,  and  people  were  meant  to  be  grateful  that  the  Roman  Empire  would  go  on  forever.  Thankfully  it  did  not.  It  is  probably  fair  to  say  that  it  was  the  French  Revolution  that  ushered  in  the  modern  age  of  slogans.  The  slogan  for  the  Revolution,  of  course,  was  a  most  appealing  one:  ‘Liberty,  Equality,  Fraternity’.  Thomas  Paine  proclaimed  ‘The  Rights  of  Man’,  and  denounced  despots.  Even  as  the  guillotine  was  working  overtime,  people  were  still  beguiled  into  thinking  that  the  shedding  of  so  much  blood  would  somehow  ring  in  utopia.  Indeed,  it  was  the  Committee  of  Public  Safety  which  praised  civic  virtues  while  waging  war  in  a  paranoid  way  on  the  Third  Estate,  as  well  as  the  First  and  Second  Estates.  Napoleon  did  not  betray  the  Revolution;  he  fulfilled  it.

Stalin  did  the  same  in  revolutionary  Russia  after  1917.  The  Bolshevik  Revolution  was  supposed  to  ensure  the  Dictatorship  of  the  Proletariat.  It  in  fact  achieved  a  brutal  dictatorship  over  the  proletariat,  and  everybody  else.  The  Communist  Manifesto  by  Karl  Marx  and  Friedrich  Engels  had  declared  that  ‘The  proletarians  have  nothing  to  lose  but  their  chains.  They  have  a  world  to  win.’  Whatever  chains  which  bound  them  in  Tsarist  days  were  exchanged  for  the  death  camps  of  the  Gulag,  and  somehow  they  failed  to  win  the  world.  Alexander  Solzhenitsyn’s  A  Day  in  the  Life  of  Ivan  Denisovich  portrayed  an  inmate  who  was  just  happy  to  be  able  to  survive  till  the  next  day.

In  Germany  the  Thousand  Year  Reich  crumbled  after  twelve  long  years.  The  ‘Strength  Through  Joy’  leisure  programme  ended  out  promoting  the  death  camps,  while  the  Charitable  Transport  Company  gathered  disabled  children  and  invalids  for  the  gas  chambers  of  the  Nazi  euthanasia  programme.  But  we  are  all  past  that,  aren’t  we?  Well,  no,  we  still  seem  prone  to  fall  for  one  utopian  lunacy  after  another.

The  Woodstock  generation  told  us  to  ‘Make  Love,  Not  War’,  and  portrayed  themselves  as  ‘gentle  people  with  flowers  in  their  hair’.  Too  often  it  all  descended  into  drugs  and  promiscuity,  accompanied  by  anger  and  even  violence.  Since  then,  the  slogans  have  continued,  without  any  sign  of  abating.  We  have  Harmony  Day  to  promote  an  artificial  harmony,  and  all  our  schools  are  ‘centres  of  excellence’,  although  standards  are  falling.  The  modern  classic  is  surely  the  demand  for  ‘Marriage  Equality’.  ‘Marriage’  sounds  a  good  thing,  as  does  ‘Equality’,  so  ‘Marriage  Equality’  must  be  doubly  good.

Add  this  to  the  soothing  rhetoric  of  Barak  Obama  after  the  Supreme  Court’s  5-4  decision  of  26  June  2015  to  allow  same-sex  marriages  throughout  the  United  States.  Obama  waxed  lyrical:  ‘This  ruling  will  strengthen  all  of  our  communities  by  offering  to  all  loving  same-sex  couples  the  dignity  of  marriage  across  this  great  land  …  And  this  ruling  is  a  victory  for  America  …  When  all  Americans  are  treated  as  equal,  we  are  all  more  free.’  Sentimentality  seems  to  have  replaced  any  capacity  for  thought  in  the  modern  media  world.  ‘Equality’  does  not  mean  ‘Sameness’;  marriage  is  a  celebration  of  differences.  It  is  the  complementary  nature  of  the  two  sexes  that  is  crucial  to  any  marriage.  Surely  too  Mr  Obama  must  know  something  about  Christian  bakers,  florists,  and  wedding  workers  who  are  being  sued  for  not  pandering  to  the  same-sex  lobby.

Mark  Twain  once  quipped  that  ‘Wagner’s  music  is  better  than  it  sounds.’  The  reverse  can  be  said  of  slogans:  the  reality  is  invariably  far  worse  than  the  rhetoric.  The  problem  lies  not  only  with  the  corrupt  and  dishonest  manipulation  of  words,  but  also  with  a  kind  of  zealous  sincerity.  Distinguishing  between  the  two  groups  is  not  always  easy.  In  any  case,  the  result  is  yet  another  illustration  of  the  words  of  Isaiah:  ‘Woe  to  those  who  call  evil  good  and  good  evil,  who  put  darkness  for  light  and  light  for  darkness,  who  put  bitter  for  sweet  and  sweet  for  bitter!’  (Isa.5:20)

The post Slogans and Deception appeared first on Banner of Truth USA.

from Banner of Truth USA http://ift.tt/2cqcezZ
via IFTTT

Advertisements